Kaokoland, Namibia

Kaokoland, Namibia

In 2017 I'll spend another 2 months in the remotest parts of Namibia. Driving around in a well equiped 4WD, looking for those places where nature is as pure as it gets, and where not many people dare to venture.

Namibia is different from my other projects, because this time I am not alone. Every week another guest joins me - to share this adventure.  Click here for all the details.

If you want to know what a trip like this can do to you, read this blog from Mundo Resink. He's the guy in this picture, taking a shower (with the daily allowance of 1 liter of water!) after we woke up in this spectacular and remote place on the Gainas Plains in Northwestern Namibia. That was somewhere here.

Want to know more? Twelve earlier guests talk about their experience in my photo book Empty.

     

  

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Kaokoland, Namibia

Kaokoland, Namibia

The Himba people live in the remote far Northwest of Namibia and have managed to maintain much of their traditional lifestyle. Members live under a tribal structure based on bilateral descent that helps them live in one of the most extreme environments on earth.

Every tribe member belongs to two clans: one through the father (a patriclan, called oruzo) and another through the mother (a matriclan, called eanda). Himba clans are led by the eldest male in the clan. Sons live with their father's clan, and when daughters marry, they go to live with the clan of their husband. However, inheritance of wealth does not follow the patriclan but is determined by the matriclan, that is, a son does not inherit his father's cattle but his maternal uncle's instead.

Bilateral descent is found among only a few groups in West Africa, India, Australia, Melanesia and Polynesia, and anthropologists consider the system advantageous for groups that live in extreme environments because it allows individuals to rely on two sets of families dispersed over a wide area.

Himba women are famous for covering themselves with otjize, a mixture of butter fat and ochre.

From: wikipedia

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Namibia

Namibia

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Namibia

Namibia

In the south of Namibia most of the farms are run by white farmers, many of them from German and Dutch descent.

Each farm will have a bunch of ‘workers’ as they are called: black men (sometimes with their families) that are housed in simple sheds a few hundred meters from the farmer’s house. Workers make appr. 70 Euros a month and have basically no rights.

Namibia

Namibia

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Namibia

Namibia

Namibia

Namibia

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Namibia

Namibia

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Namibia

Namibia

Namibia

Namibia

Namibia

Namibia

A dead flamingo on the coast near Swakopmund and the remains of a giraffe somewhere in remote Kalahari Desert.

Namibia

Namibia

Namibia

Namibia

Namibia

Namibia

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Namibia

Namibia

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